my boyfriend and i had sex but he with drawl before he ejaculated do you think there a high risk of being pregnant

There’s a risk of pregnancy, but it’s not as high as ejaculation in the vagina. Before ejaculation, all penises can leak fluid — pre-ejaculate. Pre-ejaculate itself does not contain sperm. But it may pick up sperm from a previous ejaculation as it passes through a man’s urethra. That could cause pregnancy. Pregnancy can happen when ejaculate or pre-ejaculate gets in the vagina or on the vulva.

The withdrawal method is not recommended for teens for several reasons. Many young men lack the experience and self-control to pull out in time. Some guys have been known to say they will pull out, and then they get so excited and carried away that they don’t. Some guys cannot tell when they’re going to ejaculate. Some guys ejaculate very quickly, before they realize it. And younger men are more likely to have more than one ejaculation a day, either through masturbation or sex with a partner. This increases the chance that live sperm are in the system when pre-ejaculate oozes from the penis.

Also, both ejaculate and pre-ejaculate can carry sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, and HIV. Latex and female condoms reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

If a girl is concerned about unintended pregnancy, she may want to consider taking emergency contraception (EC). EC — also known as the “morning-after pill” — is one of the safest and most effective ways to prevent unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. It is effective if started within 120 hours — five days. If started within 72 hours, EC can reduce the risk of pregnancy by 75-89 percent. So, the sooner it’s started, the better.

Plan B, a brand of EC, is available over the counter at many pharmacies for women over 17. Teens under 17 can still access EC with a prescription. EC is available at Planned Parenthood health centers, as well as college, public, and women’s health centers.

Contact your local Planned Parenthood health center to schedule an appointment. Planned Parenthood can also give you information about testing for sexually transmitted infections.