how do i put in a tampon im a begginer and the instructions dont help at all what do i do

Putting in a tampon can be tricky to figure out at first, but it gets easier with practice. One thing that can help is making sure you’re clear on exactly where the tampon should go. There are two openings in the vulva (a woman’s external sex organs) — the urethra and the vagina. Menstrual fluid flows from the vagina (the lower of the two openings), so this is where a tampon should go. Check out our Female Body Diagrams to see where the vagina is located on the vulva.

Most tampons come with a plastic or cardboard applicator, which makes it easier to slide the tampon into your vagina. Push the tip of the tampon into your vagina, hold the tampon’s applicator with your thumb and middle finger, and push in the back of the applicator with your index finger.  You’ll know the tampon is in correctly when you’ve slid the smaller piece of the applicator all the way into the larger one. Once the tampon is in, you can throw the applicator away. Some tampons are available without an applicator – you can push these tampons into your vagina with your finger.

Putting a tampon in your vagina shouldn’t be painful, but it may hurt if you’re not relaxed. You might find it’s easier for your muscles to relax if you insert a tampon while lying down. You can also try using slender or “light” tampons. These are usually thinner than “regular” or “super” tampons, which could make them easier to insert when you’re a beginner. You might also prefer to use a tampon with a plastic applicator, rather than a cardboard one.

You probably won’t feel the tampon once it’s correctly inserted. Changing tampons frequently is a good idea. You can leave a tampon in for about three or four hours, or until it’s full, whichever comes first. If it’s been less than three or four hours, you’ll know it’s time to remove a tampon if it slides out easily when you pull the string gently.

If you still find inserting a tampon to be difficult and painful, you can ask someone you trust – such as your mother, older sister, or a friend — to help you. Read more about periods and tampons here